The grown up version

Eventually, even graveyards die


My friends say I can sniff out an old graveyard. Whether a graveyard is hidden behind a storefront, on a dirt road or hidden in a grove of trees in the middle of town – it seems like I can happen upon it. To me, an old graveyard is like buried treasure. It tells a story of a time when someone lived there and was important to somebody.

This is what I’ve noticed. Even graveyards die eventually. The stones fall over (or they’re vandalized). Nature creeps in to reclaim the place where someone’s loved one was laid to rest. Here are some photos to prove my point:

A tree has just begun to creep over this stone at Bethel Presbyterian Cemetery, Walterboro, SC.

A tree has just begun to creep over this stone at Bethel Presbyterian Cemetery, Walterboro, SC.

A stone has already been claimed and framed by this tree at Prince George Winyah, Georgetown, SC.

3 A stone has already been claimed and framed by this tree at Prince George Winyah, Georgetown, SC.

It seems kind of fitting, doesn’t it? If you view death as a time of rest, then what better peace are you resting in when nature has hidden your very existence? It also means that after you’re dead, and you’re loved ones are dead; then there’s no one left to mourn you except people like me, who happen to be able to find hidden cemeteries.

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